Types of Hardwood

We supply and machine indigenous and exotic hard woods for flooring, skirting, architraves, dado rails and staircases.

 African Hard Woods:

  • African Mahogany: A light to medium dark reddish-brown. A very stable wood with grain that varies from straight through to interlocked. The interlocked grain results in the wood coming alive as you walk across the floor, as the angle of refraction changes. A wood that goes very well with furniture pieces making it easy to balance the room with soft finishings. It takes a stain very well if people are looking for a floor with less red and this does not diminish the refraction element.
  • Kiaat: Light brown to chocolate-brown with irregular darker reddish streaks. A wood filled with character and warmth which is the best floor if you are looking for a brown finish to your floor. It goes well with furniture and is not overpowering, hence making the balancing of your décor easy with soft finishings. It is sold in two formats, all brown and Savannah. Savannah is where it is you have both the heart and sapwood in an individual plank, with the sapwood being an off white in colour. It comes down to taste, as some people prefer the Savannah which adds character to the floor, whereas others prefer the uniformity of the brown throughout the floor.
  • Zim Teak: Reddish-brown with distinctive black smudges. It is very hard and makes for a stable foor. It does not have a busy grain and matures to a uniform dark red-brown colour. It makes a room very masculine and has to be very carefully countered with good soft finishings. It is sold in two formats, all brown and Savannah. Savannah is where it is you have both the heart and sapwood in an individual plank, with the sapwood initially being cream in colour. As the floor matures the cream turns pinkish, blending in better with the floor. It comes down to taste, as some people prefer the Savannah which gives the floor a bit more variation in colour, whereas others prefer the uniformity throughout the floor. Planks are generally short in length coming out of Zimbabwe, however long lengths are available out of Zambia.
  • Rosewood: Pinkish colour with lovely variations in the grain. Very hard, dense wood. It is a bit one dimensional and tends to clash with certain furniture. However, if the furniture and soft finishings are chosen carefully it can make for a stunning floor. It is sold in two formats, all brown and Savannah. Savannah is where it is you have both the heart and sapwood in an individual plank, with the sapwood initially being cream in colour. As the floor matures the cream turns pinkish, which blends in better with the floor. It comes down to taste, as some people prefer the Savannah which gives the floor a bit more variation in colour, whereas others prefer the uniformity throughout the floor.
  • Panga Panga: A very dark brown wood with tiny little yellow flecks, which do not affect the colour. It is very poular in contemporary house designs.
  • African Cherry or Makore: Pinkish brown wood. It has similar feel to that of African mahogany with a lovely grain.
  • Saligna: Large colour variations from light pink to grey. Very little grain.
  • Blackwood: Light golden-brown to deep brown (sometimes with a reddish tint) and occasionally showing black streaks. Straight or wavy grain. Stable and durable.

 Other Species / Exotic Woods:

  • White Oak: Varies in colour from pale yellow-brown to biscuit brown with a pinkish tint, similar to European oak. Straight grain. White oak is slightly harder and more durable than red oak but both are stiff and dense. High shock resistance.
  • Red Oak: Biscuit to pink coloured wood with a reddish tinge.  Mostly straight grained and coarse textured.
  • Canadian Beech: From pale white to reddish-brown wood.   Hard and elastic with good shock-resistance.
  • Ash: Creamy white with occasional streaks of light brown. Stunning grain. Elastic and hard with excellent shock-resistance.
  • Oregon Pine: Orangy-yellow wood. Quite a soft wood and traditionally used in older homes. Multigrain Oregon is a knotty wood and is traditionally available in 114mm or 152mm widths. Vertical grain Oregon is available in 84mm width and has no knots and a pinker hue. New Oregon Pine is pinker in colour than the aged wooden floors and can be substituted with Swedish Redwood which is closer in colour.
  • American Walnut: Colour varies from rich dark brown to purplish-black. Mostly straight grained, but may have some wavy grain occasionally. Strong, heavy and hard with good stability.
  • Pine: Yellow soft, knotty wood.
  • Jatoba or Brazilian Cherry: Warm reddish tint with a lovely grain. Hard, durable wood.
  • Maple: The lightest in colour of all hard wood flooring. Cream-white colour with smooth grain with occasional brown tinge. This wood has a closed grain.
  • Meranti: Colour varies in colour from light grey through to reddy-brown.  The grain is generally very straight and uniform with the odd wavy pattern.
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